Challenge mastered!

Article from Steri-World 05/2018.

2nd SF2S Congress and 4th JIFS International Francophone Sterilization Conference in Marseille, 19 – 21 September 2018
The 14th Swiss Sterilization Conference which once again was held at the Congress Centre in Biel was entitled “Hand in Hand”.
The seventh Health Facilities Scotland’s decontamination seminar was held on the 2nd May 2018 at the Golden Jubilee Conference Hotel in Glasgow, Scotland (UK). This event was organised by the Scottish Health Service Centre and Health Facilities Scotland (HFS) which are both within NHS National Services Scotland. The seminar was attended by 130 delegates including the support from 18 exhibitors. The delegates came from a range of professional backgrounds including decontamination managers and production staff, decontamination engineers, infection prevention and control nurses, theatre nurses, microbiologists, clinicians, estate managers, researchers and innovators from higher education and the independent sectors.
The most applied sterilisation method in healthcare for sterilisation of medical devices is steam. It is shown in literature, that sterilisation practices today are not completely understood [1, 2]. Literature defines “sterile” as “free of all viable organisms” [3]. Conditions to obtain sterile devices in steam sterilisation are specified in the literature [4] and standards [5]. In practice, however, it is noticed that the duration of a steam sterilisation process varies. Although the literature and standards indicate the success of a process depends on the combinations of the steriliser process, load contents, loading pattern and wrapping [5–7], no literature is found that explains the correlation between the weight of the load and the duration of the process.

At what cost?

Should we sterilize all flexible endoscopes? We seem to have been discussing this question for a very long time. I first gave a presentation around this topic in 2012 and some 6 years later we still debate where the to draw the line between those that need to be sterilized, those that should be sterilized and those that don’t need to be. Perhaps because endoscope technology changes so quickly we will always have this discussion. Or maybe the duodenoscope cleaning issues have ignited the debate again.
Welcome to issue 3 of Steri World. We have a good mix of experience reports and conference reviews with an interesting article from Stephen Kovach and colleagues on enhanced visual inspection of medical devices.
When my friendly reminder to write this editorial came from mhp I was engrossed in a documentary on the television. Its was discussing operations on babies within the womb who had signs of spina bifida.
From the Field
Background: Recent incidents of infections received from contaminated arthroscopic shavers and flexible endoscopes have led to changes in how sterile processing professionals visually inspect these medical devices. Certain shaver manufacturers have updated their Instructions for Use (IFU) to require the use of additional tools to inspect their medical devices.
Materials and methods: This three-phase study explores the development and implementation of new technologies in the area of enhanced visual inspection of medical devices. Phase 1 examines the results of surveys taken on the process of visual inspection of orthopedic shavers. Phase 2 outlines results of a small-scale inspection of orthopedic shavers in healthcare facilities.
Phase 3 details the implementation and inspection results of a borescopic examination step added into the processing procedures for a large health care facility.
The information provided by the manufacturer serves as THE BASIS FOR PROCESSING
each and every medical device (MD) and makes stringent demands on
the organizational skills of a Reprocessing Unit for Medical Devices (RUMED) [1]
with regard to the practicability and implementation of such processing measures.
The revision of EN ISO 17664:2017 is an opportune moment to examine the
changes made to the standard as well as their implications for everyday practice.
This present publication also updates Recommendation 46 of the Quality Task
Group.
Part 4: Visual inspection, maintenance and functional testing of standard atraumatic clamps
10th Hamburg Symposium of Chemische Fabrik Dr. Weigert GmbH, 22 February 2018
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